The Ballard Talisman

Unity for Change Club collects feminine hygiene products for those in need

Striving to draw attention to a commonly disregarded issue of homeless women in Seattle.

The+Unity+For+Change+club+posted+several+posters+around+the+school+encouraging+students+to+donate+tampons%2C+pads+and+other+feminine+hygiene+products+to+support+the+homeless.+The+goal+was+to+provide+women%2C+teens+and+LGBTQ%2B+members+with+the+sanitary+products+that+people+often+take+for+granted.+%0A
The Unity For Change club posted several posters around the school encouraging students to donate tampons, pads and other feminine hygiene products to support the homeless. The goal was to provide women, teens and LGBTQ+ members with the sanitary products that people often take for granted.

The Unity For Change club posted several posters around the school encouraging students to donate tampons, pads and other feminine hygiene products to support the homeless. The goal was to provide women, teens and LGBTQ+ members with the sanitary products that people often take for granted.

The Unity For Change club posted several posters around the school encouraging students to donate tampons, pads and other feminine hygiene products to support the homeless. The goal was to provide women, teens and LGBTQ+ members with the sanitary products that people often take for granted.

Piper Sloan, Co-sports editor

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The Unity For Change (UFC) Club has been conducting a tampon and pad drive for homeless women, teens and LGBTQ+ members in Seattle. Though commonly disregarded when discussing the needs of the homeless, finding feminine hygiene products can be extremely difficult for those in need.

According to Bustle, an online magazine that focuses primarily on women’s issues, homeless women often find themselves resorting to unsanitary methods of controlling menstruation, such as using socks, paper towels, plastic bags, toilet paper, towels, cotton balls, or clothing in place of hygiene products.

Not only is this an issue of hygiene and safety, but it also leaves women feeling as though they’ve lost their dignity. Many women only have the clothes on their backs, so washing out the stains in public restrooms is a disaster waiting to happen.

Isabel Waggoner, sophomore and a member of the UFC Club worked alongside other members to conduct the drive and urge people to donate. “[It’s important] so that homeless women and teens can have something that we generally take for granted and we can help the community”

    Cities such as New York City already have measurements in place to help women cope with their periods, requiring all public schools, restrooms and homeless shelters provide fee access to sanitary products, but Seattle is yet to do the same. Frequently, in order to gain access to sanitary products women are forced to steal products, or wait for outreach programs, such as this drive, to access these products.

    “The drive for homeless women and LGBTQ+ and teens who are homeless in the Seattle area and don’t have access to feminine hygiene,” said Waggoner. “People don’t really talk about it because it makes them uncomfortable to talk about this kind of stuff, but it’s really important and it’s something that a lot of homeless people struggle with and need help with.”

    Homeless women, teens and LGBTQ+ members frequently resort to makeshift products, including those mentioned above. This raises concern, not just because it’s ineffective and embarrassing for those facing the issue, but it’s also unsanitary.

    The issue of remaining clean when on one’s period doesn’t end with gaining access to tampon and pads, the lack of a steady place to shower and access to other hygiene products means that women facing this issue have no real way to get clean after they get their period.

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Unity for Change Club collects feminine hygiene products for those in need