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High School Boundary Task Force will vote on boundary scenario in January of 2018

Kylie Williams, Staff Reporter

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‘Scenario H version 2’ is the Boundary Task Force’s recommended boundary option. The boundary for Ballard High School will run down 6th AVE NW, along N 70th St, around the SW edge of Greenlake, down N Green Lake Way N, across N 50th St, down Phinney AVE N, across NW Market St and then down 15th AVE NW. To the NE of the Ballard boundary is the Ingraham boundary. The entirety of Magnolia and Queen Anne all the way down to Broad St and Denny Way would attend Lincoln along with those living west of 17th AVE NE.
(Information from Seattle Public Schools. Last updated: 10/12/17)

An open house was held in The Commons, on Oct. 26, where the High School Boundary Task Force presented three scenarios for the boundary changes that will accompany the opening of Lincoln High School in the 2019-20 school year.

According to a “Frequently Asked Questions” handout regarding high school boundary changes, the growing enrollment throughout Seattle Public Schools has created overcrowding in high schools. The opening of Lincoln will provide re-assignments that will balance the populations of Ballard, Ingraham, Roosevelt and Nathan Hale.

According to the FAQ handout the Boundary Task Force’s recommended scenario is “Scenario H Version 2,” which the School Board will vote upon in January. They will still take feedback from each of the open houses into consideration. This scenario would have residents of Magnolia and Queen Anne going to Lincoln, and some Ballard, Ingraham, Roosevelt and Nathan Hale students being moved.

In addition to this scenario, two more were also presented. “Scenario E” has residents in Magnolia and south of 85th and west of Greenwood Ave attending Ballard. Students living in Queen Anne and south of 85th and in between Greenwood and I-5, stretching down to Dearborn St, would be zoned for Lincoln.

In “Scenario F,” the boundaries for Ballard would be the same as those in “Scenario E.” The boundary for Lincoln would stay between Greenwood and I-5, but would only reach down to Denny Way, causing more students to attend Garfield.

The handout also explains that 12th graders will be grandfathered into whichever school they attend prior to the 2019-20 school year.

The boundaries were made based off of principles and criteria of equity, alignment with elementary and middle school feeder patterns, enrollment counts, diversity of programs and services and limiting change from the current boundaries.

Scenarios have been narrowed down in response to feedback from families who would be affected by the boundary changes. Also taken into consideration was each scenario’s accessibility based on transportation routes.

Some parents are very upset about the boundary changes that are to come. Kristie Gagner and Steven Rainville, parents of a current freshman at Ballard, attended the open house.

“Our daughter will be moved in her junior year. That’s the most important year for students and it would affect them the most being moved then,” Gagner said.

They also spoke of which scenarios wouldn’t be ideal.

“In ‘Scenario H Version 2,’ the NE corner of Ballard is moved to Ingraham. That would leave our daughter with a four mile walk to school,” Gagner said. “It would make more sense to keep as many kids as possible in a two mile walk zone.”

Regardless of what the boundaries will be, Lincoln will open in 2019, and it has the potential of being a 9th and 10th grade school its first year.
Along with 12th graders, it is being discussed whether 11th graders will be grandfathered in as well.

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17 Comments

17 Responses to “High School Boundary Task Force will vote on boundary scenario in January of 2018”

  1. Perrin Myerson on November 30th, 2017 5:51 PM

    This article on the rezoning of Ballard is both informative and much needed. It discusses possible boundary changes in the 2019-2020 school year which would results in kids from a variety of areas to be ripped from their schools and forced into going to the newly opened Lincoln high school. The idea of forcing students to switch high schools in their junior year is both appalling and poorly planned, as it takes place at the most important year for the class of ’21, their junior year, it could potentially mess up students’ academic progression and would not be as renowned as some of the longstanding high schools.
    In the junior year of college many kids start to search for the right college, and applying is an incredibly competitive and stressful task. In switching schools it would thrust these kids into a new environment messing up their study habits, friendships and everything they have built up with Ballard. Kids are already stressed enough, according to NBC 31 percent of teens reported to have gotten more stressed then in previous years. We should be doing what we can to minimalize that, not breed it by taking away what these kids have known and gotten used to.
    Also schools contain programs unique to them or that they excel at, which Lincoln would not have. Ballard has the 4 year engineering pathway something that would a student would have to leave if they switched to Lincoln. This would disrupt their education greatly and unnecessarily
    Finally a new school such as Lincoln would have no accolades and few clubs for students to join. For a lot of students clubs and school sports make up a lot of the high school experience which switching schools would ruin.

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  2. Andrew Bowser on November 30th, 2017 7:53 PM

    It’s common knowledge that junior year is just about the most important year in high school, and if Seattle Public Schools were to remove me from Ballard and put me in Lincoln, it would completely disrupt my high school career and most likely my college career as well. This Lincoln High School issue greatly affects me because I am a freshman in Magnolia. This means I will most likely be moved to Lincoln my junior year, as Magnolia is in the projected boundaries for LHS in “Scenario H version 2”. I want to make a change in the plans for the future opening of LHS. I do not wish to move schools my junior year, but if I was to, I would want to know more about Lincoln, it’s projected staffing, and it’s quality of education.
    I really appreciate the Talisman’s motive to inform Ballard students of important issues that affect the students themselves. I had heard about the opening of Lincoln before, but I had no idea that I might be forced to be moved my junior year. I know that the Talisman will keep coming up with great articles to inform students and will continue to make changes in the Ballard community. I plan to do my best to make a change in the Lincoln boundaries thanks to the Talisman.

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  3. Nolan Pittman on November 30th, 2017 8:29 PM

    I think the boundary line for Lincoln should stop at the Ballard locks. I personally don’t live in Magnolia but I’m pretty sure BHS is closer to it than Lincoln is. If the school board does accept the boundary, then the juniors, sophomores, and freshman of 2019 will have to take longer bus rides and car trips to go to Lincoln and that just seems out of the way. I think the school board should go south from SW greenlake into Magnolia and make that the border between BHS and Lincoln.

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  4. Erik Anderson on November 30th, 2017 10:45 PM

    I saw this and was kind of angry at the district for doing this. This isn’t fair. I know from experience that I would fall academically if I was removed from Ballard and sent to a new school. In 2014 I moved to Sweden and after living there for just 2 years I dropped a grade in math, and I perceived myself as if my own capability had dropped. I don’t think that’s fair to subject someone to. It limits their choices in the future. In my opinion, the district should send students freshmen to Lincoln and add the grade levels as students arrive. No removing them in sophomore, junior, or senior year. I planned to do chemistry this year, but that requires geometry which I had fallen behind in, so I now have 2 classes that are below my level.

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  5. George Ford on November 30th, 2017 11:10 PM

    I’m in the zone for Ballard high now and still will even after the zones are changed. So school wise i’m not affected at all. But, many of my friends, new friends, that I have made this year are in that new zone and face having to move to the new school, Lincoln. I find this very unfair that a lot of people, a lot of my friends will have to switch schools and start all over again in the middle of their high school career. But I also understand from the point of view of Seattle Public Schools, I mean they can’t just open up the new beautiful high school that they spent so much money on and only have a few hundred students enroll. But saying that, each year it will fill up more and more, until it has practically the same amount of students as other high schools like Ballard, Ingraham… And I think that the most fair solution for this problem is to let anyone in the zone currently attending ballard or ingraham, attend Lincoln when it opens. But, no one should force anyone to have to move schools. Kids should get to make a choice where they want to attend.

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  6. Evan Mount on November 30th, 2017 11:24 PM

    I’m glad that future 11th graders are still in consideration and not completely decided yet. 11th graders should be able to stay at Ballard after the changes if they want to. Many of my fellow freshman friends at school are a part of some school program, whether it be performing arts or the film program, and it doesn’t seem all that fair to take them from that in their third year. Juniors also have to take the PSATs and SATs, and that could be a whole lot more stress if you had to change schools that same year and try to orient yourself in said new school. Finally, juniors have a lot more on their plate when it comes to college selection and application, and being able to stay at a school with all your friends to get through it and at a school with so many resources and interesting things to think about majoring in, the switch to a new school would really make that vital process so much more confusing and stressful.

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  7. Adam Yee on November 30th, 2017 11:29 PM

    I believe that Seattle schools should not change borders or have Seniors and Juniors go to Lincoln because it will mess up the students schedules. This is because there will be new routes to school which doesn’t help because high schoolers already memorized their old routes to school. Also, students will be in a new environment so they will get lost and be tardy. If only Freshman came to the school the first year then it would be fine. This is because it would be like going to a new school. These are the reasons why Juniors and Seniors should stay at Ballard when Lincoln is built.

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  8. Bella Angelos on December 1st, 2017 12:36 AM

    I think overall the new Lincoln High School will create more space in schools and supply students with another option. As said in the article “Lincoln will open in 2019, and it has the potential of being a 9th and 10th grade school it’s first year” which is a good way to allow Juniors and Seniors to get to stay for their last two years, and allow entering 9th graders to go to a brand new High School. However a problem I see occurring is the movement of the Sophomores because the process of going into a new school, will be repeated again. I feel that the boundaries will be argued and differ for everyone. “That would leave our daughter with a four mile walk to school” one parent explains that her daughter (because of the boundary lines) would be walking an extra two more miles because she would be going to a school further from her house. I agree with the fact that they should keep the boundaries so that the students can live a decent distance away from the school they are attending. I know for a fact I would rather go to a school two miles away than four. I would side with those who will be forced to leave the high school they have been attending for a whole year already. Having to restart and move to a whole new school will not please many students. Not only could the boundaries possibly cause a longer distance from school but it will separate peers and ultimately disappoint many who will no longer get to go to school with their friends that don’t live around them.

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  9. Camille Dixon on December 1st, 2017 12:48 AM

    This new boundary system will transfer students in their last two years of high school, arguably the most important years of high school. This is when you try to figure out what you want your goals to be in life, when you decide what you really love, what college you really want to go to and how you’re going to get there. By transferring students during that time in their lives where they’re trying to start getting it together, not only will there be academic imbalance, but also relational and social challenges.
    Spending the last two years being with people, teachers, and a system well known, and then being shoved into a new, completely foreign one will throw anyone off balance. Yes, it is a good life skill, and some people thrive that way, but according to the NCBI and US National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health, 7% of over-summer transfer students didn’t even graduate. Seattle Public Schools all use the same system, but each teacher has their own style and form, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing because that’s how it’s going to be at any school. The social aspect is honestly the biggest problem. A student’s entire high school experience is based on status at an academic and social level, and when they’re forced to restart, it’s derailing them off any academic trajectory they were going on and giving little to no time to get back up. The University of Chicago Press even held studies that supported the idea of being mobile during the time between 8th and 12th grade as a, less drastic, equivalent to dropping out of high school. So not only is changing high schools a big risk factor in the social and academic department, but could even lead to an early dropout.

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  10. Sam Hughes on December 1st, 2017 7:37 AM

    2019-20 boundaries narrowed down to three options.

    My overall opinion on this is split. I’m on both sides but mainly against the idea of splitting the school district zones. I can see how this will be bad to people who are going to be affected by this. Especially if you have thought out plans for your school in the future and that would change it. The reason it is good though is because in the future the school districts or schools won’t have to deal with over population. If a school got overpopulated like how Ballard is than the school would need more money to build on. With the opening of Lincoln and this change it prevents that situation from happening. If that happened your child would have to switch schools and maybe it would be hard to transport that child to your new school. Personally for me I might have to go from Ballard to Ingraham High school my junior year. I am in an unfortunately in a small area for this to happen. Hopefully I will not have to go because the people responsible for this are talking about grandfathering in the juniors, which is what I would be if this happened. Also I wouldn’t want to go because obviously I would have to restart at a completely new school and make friends over again. Also because it would be a pain to go from my house to Ingraham which is about a 20 minute drive. Overall them doing this is for the better, but unluckily this will affect people that this happens to in mostly a negative way.

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  11. Sam Hughes on December 1st, 2017 7:38 AM

    2019-20 boundaries narrowed down to three options

    My overall opinion on this is split. I’m on both sides but mainly against the idea of splitting the school district zones. I can see how this will be bad to people who are going to be affected by this. Especially if you have thought out plans for your school in the future and that would change it. The reason it is good though is because in the future the school districts or schools won’t have to deal with over population. If a school got overpopulated like how Ballard is than the school would need more money to build on. With the opening of Lincoln and this change it prevents that situation from happening. If that happened your child would have to switch schools and maybe it would be hard to transport that child to your new school. Personally for me I might have to go from Ballard to Ingraham High school my junior year. I am in an unfortunately in a small area for this to happen. Hopefully I will not have to go because the people responsible for this are talking about grandfathering in the juniors, which is what I would be if this happened. Also I wouldn’t want to go because obviously I would have to restart at a completely new school and make friends over again. Also because it would be a pain to go from my house to Ingraham which is about a 20 minute drive. Overall them doing this is for the better, but unluckily this will affect people that this happens to in mostly a negative way.

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  12. Caleb Wagner on December 1st, 2017 8:32 AM

    Kylie Williams you did a great job of portraying the topic of Lincoln high school, I haven’t really payed much attention to this issue yet but you have opened my eyes. I have friends who will be moved to Lincoln in their junior year with most of the proposals with the new boundaries. I will not be directly effected in the way of me being moved to Lincoln but it will make the school seem more empty because alot of people live in Magnolia and Queen Anne.

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  13. Reid Hooper on December 1st, 2017 10:16 AM

    Personally, this change wouldn’t affect me switching schools, but I can see why it wouldn’t be good for a lot of people. I live 5 blocks from here, so I would still be headed here but I have several friends that would get switched to Ingraham and Lincoln. However, I also have several friends that are at Ingraham right now that would get switched to here, do that would be a plus. At the same time, switching schools junior year would be awful, because you would have to get accustomed to a whole new group of people and school layout and schedule. Overall, I don’t want this change to happen but I think it has to happen to filter kids to Lincoln and evenly distribute students.

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  14. Ethan Barnes on December 1st, 2017 1:08 PM

    This proposition is a bad one as it affects many people who go to a high school they very much like and have friends at their school could be moved to a new school that will have a limited high school experience at a new school that no one knows. This doesn’t appear to affect me as much, as I have two houses, but some of my friends will be affected and I hope they won’t be affected too much.

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  15. cooper smith on December 1st, 2017 1:13 PM

    In my opinion the Lincoln high school boundary change is an awful idea. The change will put our students behind the rest of the children in the area that went unchanged. The article said that in the year 2020 the juniors sophomores and freshmen that are around the queen Anne and magnolia are are going to be moved to a new school that is farther away this change will make the commute a lot harder and longer than it already does as a student living in Queen Anne my commute on the Seattle public buses it can take me the upwards of an hour to get home. This is not ok to move me to Lincoln it could almost double that time and then it would take a lot of time out of my day for the homework and extracurricular activities. Also moving students in their junior year is a tremendous mistake, your junior year is the most important year in that you have college admissions and other important tests it would significantly decrease my ability to succeed so if i was the school board I would call off these changes.

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  16. Zenon Triantafillidis on December 1st, 2017 2:31 PM

    All though these possible changes to the school district areas could affect many well bonded relationships with students, I believe this is the logical thing to do because these high schools are getting way to crowded. According to fellow friends from other schools they have circumstances similar to ours of Ballard High School which is way to overcrowded for the halls. The increase of freshman arriving at BHS happens annually and each year the halls will get more and more full at this rate. The freshman class can barely fit into the auditorium which is a sign that their are just too many kids for the school.

    On top of the government putting barely any money aside for schools, now we have schools getting maxed out which could lead to lack in distributing supplies fairly. Now at the moment this isn’t the biggest deal but even now it is known. Adding new schools will be an effective solution to our problem and it will improve our schools academically.

    Not only will the school eventually max out which will cause lack of supplies, it will also cause sports issues, to many kids will be trying out for sports that eventually sports team will have to be very strict and demanding, even more than it is now, this will lower self esteem of many students and change the sorts teams which is a huge part of the high school experience.

    Doing this will mess up a lot of people’s relationships which could affect someone mentally which will also affect someone in their academic performance, but this is something we need to sacrifice to better our school districts efficiency. Therefor I do believe the rights outmatch the wrongs making this choice better for the majority.

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  17. Melina Winters on December 3rd, 2017 12:34 PM

    This article was very analytical about what the opening of Lincoln High School means for Seattle students. I had heard about the lines being redrawn, but didn’t really know the specifics about how it would affect Seattle neighborhoods. I think since we are juniors, we are going to be safe from having to switch schools since Lincoln doesn’t open until after we graduate. I was very relieved about this.
    I can’t imagine having to switch schools so abruptly without a choice. This article was really thought-provoking, especially for current sophomores and freshmen at Ballard. I hope that at least the sophomores can remain at Ballard for their senior year and not have to switch schools. I liked how that possibility was mentioned in the article, it cleared up that question that I’m sure many readers had.
    As for the current freshmen, it seems like they may face a school change in a couple years. That is a shame that the district will force them to switch for their crucially important junior year. I really enjoyed how the article included a quote from a parent of a freshmen who voiced their disapproval of the new boundaries. This provided a lot of insight into the impact the opening of Lincoln will have on our community.
    Lastly, I don’t see the point at all in re-routing Magnolia and Queen Anne students to Lincoln. Magnolia and Queen Anne are much closer to Ballard than Lincoln. Traffic is bad enough getting to Ballard from the south. Commuting to Lincoln everyday would be a sheer nightmare. This makes me question the district’s knowledge of their power and what they are doing to Seattle families. I suppose it makes sense to re-route some Ingraham students to Lincoln since they’re much closer to Lincoln than Magnolia or Queen Anne is. However, I think the High School Boundary Task Force needs to reassess their decision to move southern neighborhoods further to Lincoln, because nothing about that makes any shred of sense.

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High School Boundary Task Force will vote on boundary scenario in January of 2018