International student arrives late into the first quarter

Freshman moves to Seattle after living in Africa, Europe and the East Coast

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International student arrives late into the first quarter

Jamet was born in England but moved to Tanzania when he was a baby.

Jamet was born in England but moved to Tanzania when he was a baby.

Courtesy of Eliot Jamet

Jamet was born in England but moved to Tanzania when he was a baby.

Courtesy of Eliot Jamet

Courtesy of Eliot Jamet

Jamet was born in England but moved to Tanzania when he was a baby.

Kylie Williams, Online Editor

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For most students, moving schools might mean a jump to a different school district, city or maybe even a different state. For freshmen Eliot Jamet, it means moving to a different country. Jamet has lived in four cities and three different countries and continents.

Jamet was born in Scarborough, England. His mom is English and his dad is French, so he grew up speaking both languages. When he was still a baby, his family moved to Tanzania after his mom, an entomologist, got a new job. After three years in Tanzania, Jamet and his family moved to Lausanne, Switzerland.

Courtesy of Eliot Jamet
Jamet lived in Switzerland from the time he was 3 until he was 10.

Courtesy of Eliot Jamet
Jamet went to an international school Washington D.C., where he lived from when he was 10 until October of 2018.

“My dad decided that I should have more culture and we decided to move to Switzerland,” Jamet said. “I lived seven years there and managed to meet a lot of great people.”

Jamet’s mom then got a job in Washington D.C., and the family’s bags were packed once more, off to another part of the world. In D.C., Jamet attended the Rochambeau French International School.

“I was in Rochambeau for a long time,” Jamet said. “There was a part of me that liked that school, but there was a part of me that didn’t because that school was stressful.”

At Rochambeau, Jamet took art and sports classes, three different languages—English, French and Spanish—in addition to core classes.

“The thing is, this was in middle school, and it was tough,” said Jamet. “Instead of picking the things that you wanted, you had to do everything.”

In D.C. Jamet met people he described as the ones who will be his lifelong best friends.

“I think I got the best friend ever,” Jamet said. “We still talk and play video games together when we can. I miss him but I know I’ll see him again someday.”

After four and a half years in D.C., Jamet’s mom  got a job with the Melinda Gates Foundation, and at the end of November., he started at another new school.

“The hardest part about moving is leaving behind the memories and people,” Jamet said.“It can be tiresome to go to the airplane over and over again, but it’s actually kind of fun.”

Especially after going to Rochambeau, with such as rigorous curriculum, moving to a public school and having so much flexibility has been an enjoyable transition.

“You get to choose the classes you want here,” Jamet said. “I think we’re going to stay in Seattle for a while because this is the best school out of all of them.”

After living in places many Americans only dream of going to, Jamet deems Seattle his favorite over Europe, Africa and the nation’s capital.

“I just love everything about Seattle, it may be my favorite city that I’ve been because it’s both a suburban city and a natural city,” Jamet said.

And after prestigious international schools and Swiss academies, Jamet describes his current school as the one where he found his home the fastest.

“I really like this place,” Jamet said. “What’s weird is all the schools I’ve been to previously, they didn’t give me friends at first. I remember, it took me a few weeks to get my first friend and have someone be like ‘hey, you want to be my friend and hang out?’ However, this school, the first day I come in, there’s a bunch of people wanting to talk to me and be friends. I was amazed by that and I have a good feeling for the future.”

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