The Ballard Talisman

Engineer on the rise

Student determined in reaching his goals

Though inspiration comes easily, engineering isn’t as simple as slapping together a couple of parts. It’s an art requiring mathematical and scientific knowledge to build something.

Samantha Swainson

Though inspiration comes easily, engineering isn’t as simple as slapping together a couple of parts. It’s an art requiring mathematical and scientific knowledge to build something.

Samantha Swainson, Staff Reporter

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A figure stands in front of a long blue table littered with various tools and wires. The fast undertones of Mack

lemore fill the long space. The figure moves into the light, screwdriver in hand. Tall with sandy brown hair and green eyes, freshman Evan Meyer works on his latest project.

The clink of metal sounds, a tool falling to the table.

It started in 6th grade with a small light-following robot. With help from his father, a carpenter, along with the internet and necessity or want, Meyer’s creations have slowly progressed to hand-carved swords and automatic doors. Inspiration never seems far from Meyer.

A drill echoes through the room.

Evan Meyer

Though inspiration comes easily, engineering isn’t as simple as slapping together a couple of parts. It’s an art requiring mathematical and scientific knowledge to build something. Professional engineering also uses economic, social and practical knowledge to construct for the public. There are multiple branches of engineering including chemical, mechanical, civil and electrical engineering.

A quiet “ouch” is muttered when a hand slips on the table.

Despite his years of practice, the hopeful engineer admits he’s new to the art, confessing that he needs to know more before taking the next step in the learning process. “Right now I don’t really have enough knowledge,” Meyer said. “[I need to] know how to be able to make things without breaking them.”

Again, the sounds of the drill fill the room.

Meyer shared his numerous attempts, successes and even failures. “I tried to build a drone, but when I plugged it in it melted.” With a wave of his hands, Meyer then went on to explain why. “It probably short circuited.”

The modern world is full of engineering mistakes even by professionals: the Kansai International Airport in Japan was built on a manmade island with a reputation for sinking and a skyscraper built in New York in 1977 had the first nine stories on stilts.

Metals clink together once more.

Finally a smile graces Meyer’s face as he holds his long board to the light and glows with a sense of accomplishment. What seems to be a small feat to one, is great to another. The new tracts of his long board are added, and now it’s on to the next project.

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Engineer on the rise